Recruitment, Talent Sourcing, @NRL_Bulldogs and random thoughts…

Posts tagged “blogging

Arriving too early… for an interview – Not a good idea!

I love LinkedIn, although the ability to keep track of the continuous stream of information is pretty tough.

This afternoon whilst perusing the updates from my network, I noticed an agency recruiter post an update about candidates arriving too early for an interview – so for the benefit of my network, I’ll provide some guidance on this.

Arriving too early to an interview is as detrimental as arriving late. Best time to arrive in reception is 5 minutes before your interview. If you arrive by car (or public transport) early to your interview, don’t rock up to reception with plenty of time to spare, go to a cafe, or go for a brisk stroll, or stay in your car singing (actually, only do this if you park a few blocks away… actually, don’t do this, you might lose your voice!)

I like to compare the recruitment process to dating…

An interview is like a first date, so it might be worth considering the following:-

Do

• Dress to impress
• Keep your answers clear and succinct
• Keep your language as positive as possible. Negativity is frowned upon.
• Firm handshakes – not the floppy fish.
• Have questions about the team you may join handy

Do not

• Flirt (yes this works for both sexes, and it does happen!!!)
• Don’t speak ill of your current employer
• Smoke a cigarette before the interview… outside the door of the office. You will smell like cigarettes! Not good! Actually, make sure your breath doesn’t smell, you have sprayed some deodorant (or used some form of deodorant) and (maybe) a little dab of cologne or perfume.
• It’s not a stand up comedy routine, you can have a laugh, but keep it professional! (I’m guilty of this!)

However, back to my initial reason for this post, don’t come too soon, or your thoughts of making your permanent arrival at your potential employer may never happen!

Want to stay in touch? Connect with me on LinkedIn http://linkd.in/HRQ2fp


LinkedIn Recruiter Test needs updating…

For those of you who weren’t aware, in Jan 2013, LinkedIn removed the LinkedIn Answers feature of their site.

Below is the note on their site, plus the link.

“As of January 31, 2013, the LinkedIn Answers feature will be retired from LinkedIn. We’ll be focusing our efforts on the development of new and more engaging ways to share and discuss professional topics across LinkedIn. In the meantime, you can still pose questions and facilitate professional discussions through other popular LinkedIn channels including LinkedIn Polls, Groups, or status updates.” http://help.linkedin.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/35227

I never really used LinkedIn Answers… I found that interacting with people within the LinkedIn Groups was a better way to connect and network with the Professionals I was targeting.

I’ve just gone through the process to become a LinkedIn Recruiter Expert. Question 1 is about branding. And look what I have found.

Check out the 5th Bullet Point

Check out the 5th Bullet Point

Questions 6 and 7 are both on LinkedIn Answers. Does this mean I got the answers incorrect?

More references to LinkedIn Answers which no longer exists

More references to LinkedIn Answers which no longer exists

EVEN More references to LinkedIn Answers which no longer exists
EVEN More references to LinkedIn Answers which no longer exists

Whilst this may not be high up on the agenda of things that required improvement, it is something that does need to be sorted.

LinkedIn…. You’re Welcome! 🙂


My response to another annoying News.com.au article on LinkedIn

Feel free to read the article.

http://www.news.com.au/technology/biztech/the-dos-and-donts-of-linkedin-how-not-to-make-it-awkward/story-fn5lic6c-1226560691515

Ok… I wanted to put together something highly intelligent but to be brutally honest, my brain is yet to recover from 6 weeks of honeymooning extravaganzas which included close to 10 days in Vegas, and 11 nights in an all-inclusive hotel in Playa del Carmen, Mexico… So I am just gonna answer the questions the news.com.au posts.

  • Is it appropriate to recommend your boss for key skills? Yes, why would this be an issue, you work with them and if they are good at what they do, it is a simple click of a button to recommend them. If you don’t think they are good at any of the skills that are shown, don’t recommend.
  • And what if someone you work with asks for a recommendation? What if you secretly think they’re rubbish at their job? LinkedIn contacts should only ask for recommendations from those who they have worked with or for. If you don’t rate someone, you just ignore the request, or if you are like me, message them saying you don’t feel comfortable recommending them.
  • Do you send a courtesy email when somebody adds you? Not an email, I usually reply back to the person saying thanks for adding me and I hope we can stay in touch and assist one another in the near future.
  • And oh-dear-god I forgot to log out before looking at a competitor’s profile so now they probably think I’m some kind of weird stalker – this isn’t a question, but you should really just slap yourself for this comment… This is a public website, where people knowingly put their details online to share with others. I’ve made numerous contacts on LinkedIn via the “Stalking” method. As a Recruiter, I’ve placed the majority of my candidates via LinkedIn. Staying logged in to LinkedIn whilst viewing profiles enables you to have a conversation with the person you are checking out, without it feeling too weird. For those who want to go into complete stalker mode, you don’t have to log out, you can simply set your profile to being private via the settings panel.

stalker meme

  • Sydney-based marketing manager Michael (not his real name) told news.com.au that he asked some of his colleagues for a LinkedIn recommendation after quitting his job but forgot to change the email address his LinkedIn notifications were sent to –  Michael is an idiot, and should have an external email setup specifically for his LinkedIn account. You have the option to add multiple email addresses to your LinkedIn account just in case your account gets hacked, if you forget your password, or so you can find contacts listed within those various accounts.
  • “Funnily enough the same manager has tried connecting with me since which I find very amusing,” he said.
    The above is still from Michael, who based on his comments is 15 and has left his marketing role at the local Maccas. You should always try to leave your employer without burning bridges. I wonder if he connected with the manager. I would have made a point to connect and catch up with them for a coffee or a beer to ensure that we are on good terms.So, what are you going to take away from my rebuttal? Something I hope… 

Happy new year all!


Perth recruiters – #SOSU12 Perth is almost here, what are you waiting for?!!?

I was very fortunate to secure myself a ticket to #SOSU12 in Sydney earlier this year, and what an awesome event it was…

We started the morning over a cup of coffee and some light food and were sharing war stories with other internal recruiters from small businesses and global corporates, which put a huge smile on my face. The ability to network with other geeky recruiters and talent acquisition professionals is a rarity, and this event allowed me to do this.

I was chatting with great sourcing minds like Dan Nuroo, Christian Le Leoux and Mark Reilly, Recruiters with awesome personalities like Nathan Wong and Rod Ko and the up and coming divas of sourcing Vanessa Duke and Danielle Arabi

AND this was all before the event officially kicked off!

The piece de resistance was by far Irina Shimaeva , softly spoken and extremely witty, Irina shows you how “basic searches” can bring you sensational results. If you are an advanced user of Boolean search strings, then come with your questions ready.

I’m doing my best to get to Perth to see Mas Bianchi speak, this is a lady who has worked for some of the largest mining companies globally in a sourcing capacity, and I am wondering what wonderful tricks she has up her sleeve to share with #SOSU12.

There are still a few seats left remaining so if you want to network with your fellow Sourcing Pros from Western Australia and beyond, and learn some innovative tips from abroad, Register yourself NOW!!!

For your viewing pleasure

Something I thought I’d throw in to put a smile on your face.


My reply to “Does LinkedIn really get the job done?” on News.com.au

My reply to “Does LinkedIn really get the job done?” on News.com.au http://www.news.com.au/technology/does-linkedin-really-get-the-job-done/story-e6frfro0-1226461168019 (if you haven’t read it, you probably should now)

For those of you who don’t know me, my name is Mark Mansour, I am an ex-techy, ex-telco salesman turned recruiter who has 8 years of technology and engineering recruitment experience in the Asia-Pacific market.

On Thursday morning upon my arrival to work, I went through my e-mails and setup my priorities for the day, and took 5 minutes to browse some substandard journalism on news.com.au.

This article caught my attention… Why? Because as someone who has filled hundreds of jobs via LinkedIn, I felt it necessary to put a human, real world touch on something that reeks of last-minute-article-submission-syndrome (Yes Claire Connelly, you has L.M.A.S.S!)

Firstly, I’ve conducted a couple of different searches (out of my own interest for Jeff Atwood), one via Google (searching for LinkedIn profiles with his details – no success), via LinkedIn Recruiter (again, no success) and via my own account which has 15,000+ direct connections (again no luck)… So, I simply ran a Google search for “Jeff Atwood” “software designer” and found his Blog – http://www.codinghorror.com/blog/ . In geek terminology, this guy is pretty cool. Same background as myself, grew up on BBSes.

Why did I do this? Well, I love to know who it is that complains about the #1 site for talent attraction and professional networking…  (yeah I know, you thought I was going to keep rambling, didn’t you?)

I am a big advocate of sites such as LinkedIn (they enable me to proactively connect with people I wouldn’t normally interact with to provide them with opportunities to either

A)      Work for THE largest global technology and services company

B)       Work for a company the lives and breathes DIVERSITY

C)       Take that next step in their Career.

Ok, so the above may come across as the “Mark Mansour Recruitment Sales Pitch”, but let’s think about the alternative…

  • You apply to a job via a Job board.
  • You hold your breath waiting for a phone call from the company or recruiter.
  • How exhale because you have held your breath for too long
  • You take another deep breath.
  • You fall, hit your head on your computer desk and are rushed to the Emergency Room for a nasty cut, and potentially jailed for “assaulting and battering” yourself.

(ok the last is an extreme, but you get where I am coming from).

So let’s get back to basics… Who should use LinkedIn?

In my opinion, everyone, however, “white collar” workers have more to gain than blue collar workers. Why? Well, normal job boards tend to have a greater amount of these types of jobs advertised. If you are to call and follow up your application, the response rate will tend to be higher. However, where you could use LinkedIn is to identify who the “hiring manager” or HR rep for the organisation is, and either call them via the switch, or send a personal message via A) One of your connections (this will work better than à)  B) Directly, to indicate you have applied for a specific position and are keen to discuss it.

Whether you like it or not, EVERYONE is a passive candidate. Depending on the way you slept the night before, whether the local café got your order right/wrong, whether your boss has given you a greater workload than others, you are a passive candidate!

What does this mean? You may be happy with your current job, but if someone came along and “sold” you the dream job, you wouldn’t hesitate to leave.

Dream job can be interpreted as:-

  • More money (base salary or bonus)
  • Greater flexibility (work/life balance)
  • More interesting work
  • Better management team
  • Additional mentoring, training and support
  • Extra benefits (medical insurance, life insurance)
  • Or a combo of all the above.

So why does this mean you should be on LinkedIn?

Well, your LinkedIn profile allows colleagues, past and present, to recommend your work publicly. The more recommendations you have, the likelier you are to receive interest from a potential organisation about your skills. Also, at its basic level, LinkedIn does not cost you a cent. You list your skills and experience almost like you would on your own CV, and it sits there. You can see who viewed your profile. You connect with other colleagues or clients.

During the GFC, organisations that were still hiring did so through internal networks, which meant a reduced utilisation of agencies. By connecting with colleagues on LinkedIn, you are able to stay in touch and network regarding future roles.

As a final note regarding LinkedIn… As with everything in life, you get out what you put in… If you just list the titles of what you have done, add 1 colleague, and then expect the world to notice you, please be advised, You are not in a fairy tale. You should be active, engage in the variety of groups, add more information, recommend colleagues, add skills to your profile.

Most recruitment systems now allow you to apply by using your LinkedIn profile… So if you are sick of getting no replies from potential employers, use LinkedIn, build your profile, and the results will speak for themselves!


WTF are you thinking?!? What NOT to post on Social Media sites!

Wow!!! I am continually surprised, infuriated and just plain gobsmacked by the ridiculous things people post on Facebook/Twitter/Instagram etc etc.

Most recently, I’ve seen the body of a young baby boy, just over a year old who had recently passed away, being placed in his coffin, and prepared with family, prior to the funeral taking place. This is just unbelievable!!!

I’m not sure what would lead a person to think that posting a dead body on a social media site is a good thing to do… Or why the hell the person who posted the image would then tag the child’s mother!

Let’s not forget the people who like the image… HOW THE HECK can you like an image of a dead child! In my humble opinion, this image and many like it should be reported to Facebook or other said sites and removed. Posting a photo online of a dead body is no different to sending the picture framed and signed to the parents! It is just bad bloody taste!

On the topic of deceased people, one thing you should never do is tag someone in a post…. For example, posting something like, “Can’t believe it has been a year since @ThePersonWhoDied passed away… We miss you!” is fine. Checking yourself in to a cemetery and posting “Having a smoke with @ThePersonWhoDied” is just ridiculous, if you have done this, you should give yourself an uppercut!

Aside from the fact that it is just weird to be checking yourself into a cemetery, don’t forget that you should have respect for the dead. They are meant to be at peace. Posting something like this makes a mockery of them, and also makes you look like a fruit-loop!

The one thing that I find very sketchy when it comes to social media is cursing… Swearing! There is a fine line with what you post to social media. It depends who your friends are and which social network you use. Facebook tends to be free flowing, as you generally only add people you know to Facebook, people who you are happy to expose to your ignorance (yes this is a tongue in cheek comment!)

Twitter is the social network that you should always be mindful of. Everything you post is a representation of your brand. If you curse, you will lose followers as your message loses its power, unless you are a gangsta rapper trying to win street cred, however, I am a bit old school, and the rappers I listen to solved their problems with guns, not words on a social media site.

So… what have we learnt??? Something I hope!